Add this Book to Your Library

June 18, 2020 — 15 Comments

No one can teach us to “write like C.S. Lewis.” The great author was definitely one of a kind.

It is possible, however, to study Lewis’ advice about writing. And that is a journey well worth taking.

Many students of C.S. Lewis are quite curious about his advice for writing well. And, for the proverbial “limited time,” the premier study of that subject is available at an unbelievable price.

The kindle version of C. S. Lewis and the Art of Writing: What the Essayist, Poet, Novelist, Literary Critic, Apologist, Memoirist, Theologian Teaches Us about the Life and Craft of Writing is only three dollars at amazon. (Great subtitle, right?)

Coincidentally, I only recently purchased the volume for my Logos library (at a significantly higher cost). I’ve yet to read it, but it appears to be worth what I paid. Still, I don’t want any readers of Mere Inkling to miss out on this opportunity to get such a bargain.

Wipf and Stock, the publishers, regularly place a few titles from their excellent list on sale. The current offering features another book I previously purchased at full price, The Gospel According to Star Trek: The Original Crew. (I mention that, confident there is at least one other trekkie out there reading this.)

Writing about Writing

Many people who follow blogs such as Mere Inkling are bloggers themselves. It’s rare to find a writer who doesn’t also like to read. And because of the complementarity of reading and writing, books about writing always find an audience.

In my “works in progress” (research) files, I have a handful of projects related to writing. One of them is—digital drumroll—C.S. Lewis on Writing.

That’s the main reason I haven’t begun reading the book I’m recommending. While I assume our approaches to the topic will be different enough to avoid any suggestion of plagiarism, I’m reluctant to open the door to unsought influences.

I have never plagiarized, and never will. In fact, I tend to overattribute thoughts. So, eventually I will read the work, since I’m forearmed with my integrity, and I understand that, as a well-known science fiction writer once reminded me . . .

Ideas cannot be copyrighted—only the particular expressions of ideas are protected by copyright.

As the writer of “5 Things that Can’t be Copyrighted” says:

Ideas can not [sic] be copyrighted because they are not fixed into a tangible medium of expression. For a work to be copyrighted, it has to be written down, saved to a hard drive or somehow otherwise fixed.

For example, if you give a speech but fail to write it down first and it isn’t recorded, there is no copyright protection. . . . it is the expression of the idea that is protected. My “5 Things That Can’t Be Copyrighted” post is fixed, but you can certainly write your own post with the same title and idea. However, you can not use my exact words, unless, of course, you follow my CC [Creative Commons] license.

Those of you who are American can learn more about protections covered in the United States at this site. They dispel some of the myths associated with copyrights, such as whether something must be (1) “published” or (2) registered to be protected. (The answer to both is “no.”)

Someday you may have an opportunity to read C.S. Lewis on Writing by yours truly. In the meantime, don’t miss the opportunity to add C.S. Lewis and the Art of Writing to your personal library.

15 responses to Add this Book to Your Library

  1. 

    Thanks for recommend this book. Definitely will be on my TBR list.

  2. 

    For those who don’t wish to patronise Amazon I suggest Abe books or Alibris

    • 

      I concur with the sentiment of supporting alternative book sources. The only reason I am referring folks to amazon is because the sale is just for the kindle product.

  3. 

    Hi Rob,

    I look forward to those reads, awesome. Thanks for the shout out for being that one Star Trek fan of yours. Ha.

    Have a great weekend. How is your book coming along? I am preparing to release book 1 again. I will let you know how it goes.

    In Christ,

    Gary

    • 

      I’ve been a fan of Star Trek–good, bad and mediocre–ever since the I watched the very first episode of the original series when it first aired.

      As for my book(s)… they are in various stages. Several are well over 50% of the way toward completion. Life is busy though, and it is difficult for me to focus enough on a–single–project to get it through to completion.

  4. 

    I am not the CS Lewis scholar you are. But I greatly enjoy his work and writing style. Stylistic suggestions may be helpful. To generate the quality of work CS Lewis did, I suspect, would require a mind as brilliant mind as his.

    • 

      I agree, Anna, that very few are blessed with the brilliance of a C.S. Lewis. That would be a prerequisite to replicating his “success.” However, it goes beyond that, I think.

      The moment in history during which we live and the country we call home (with its unique culture and educational opportunities) are factors. Another would be courage–a requirement for those who write about unpopular subjects, such as the promotion of the Christian faith.

      I’m sure you and I could quickly come up with a number of other elements that play a role in the successful dissemination of knowledge. (Oh, and thank you for the compliment.)

  5. 

    Live long and prosper, Sir Stroud. :D

Offer a Comment or Insight

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.