C.S. Lewis & Brexit

June 28, 2016 — 8 Comments

brexitThe United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union has shocked the world . . . and it caused me to wonder just what C.S. Lewis would think of the narrow decision to reaffirm their national identity.

It turns out, I’m not the first to ponder the question.

A quick internet search led me to an interesting post by a British academic who addresses this very point. The political philosophy of the Inklings is not the focus of his essay, but in response to a question posed by Arthurian writer David Llewellyn Dodds, he writes the following:

Dodds: I don’t have a sense of what, if anything, the major post-1945 Inklings said about things like the Council of Europe, the ECSC, the EEC,and Euratom (all within Lewis’s lifetime), the Merger Treaty, the UK joining the European Communities (within which Tolkien lived his last nine months), and all the further developments through and within which Barfield lived. Has anyone surveyed this?

. . . I hope and pray the re-emergence of the UK from the EU will indeed be taken up to its own good, the true good of Europe, the Commonwealth, and the world, and in that the resistance to the ongoing strivings (conscious or usefully idiotic) for ‘the Abolition of Man.’*

Bruce Charlton: I think I have probably read all the relevant material about Tolkien and Lewis. Tolkien would certainly and Lewis very probably have been against Britain or England subordinating itself to Europe. About Barfield and Williams, I am not sure.

This matches my own sense of what Lewis and Tolkien would say about the decision to reassert the United Kingdom’s historical identity. They would applaud it.

While neither man was a supporter of the many excesses to which nationalism is prone, they would recognize the listless European experiment as the bloated and doomed effort it has become.

In The Screwtape Letters we witness how the Tempter skillfully recognizes that the abuse of any principle can twist it into something destructive. Since Lewis was writing during a global war (a reality in our modern world as well) he used the powerful dichotomy between patriotic supporter of the nation’s war and pacifist.

I had not forgotten my promise to consider whether we should make the patient an extreme patriot or an extreme pacifist. All extremes, except extreme devotion to the Enemy, are to be encouraged. Not always, of course, but at this period. Some ages are lukewarm and complacent, and then it is our business to soothe them yet faster asleep. Other ages, of which the present is one, are unbalanced and prone to faction, and it is our business to inflame them. . . .

Whichever he adopts, your main task will be the same. Let him begin by treating the Patriotism or the Pacifism as a part of his religion. Then let him, under the influence of partisan spirit, come to regard it as the most important part. Then quietly and gradually nurse him on to the stage at which the religion becomes merely part of the ‘cause,’ in which Christianity is valued chiefly because of the excellent arguments it can produce in favour of the British war-effort or of Pacifism.

The attitude which you want to guard against is that in which temporal affairs are treated primarily as material for obedience. Once you have made the World an end, and faith a means, you have almost won your man, and it makes very little difference what kind of worldly end he is pursuing. Provided that meetings, pamphlets, policies, movements, causes, and crusades, matter more to him than prayers and sacraments and charity, he is ours—and the more ‘religious’ (on those terms) the more securely ours. I could show you a pretty cageful down here . . .

Returning to the Brexit column, which I encourage you to read in full, the author is Bruce Charlton. He teaches Psychology at Newcastle University and is a Visiting Professor of Theoretical Medicine at the University of Buckingham.

Here are a couple of quotations to whet your appetite for his astute analysis of the political and religious climate in the United Kingdom.

Unsurprisingly, the situation seems to be that the majority of those with highest status, power, education and wealth (i.e. the Secular Left, Politically Correct Social Justice Warriors) want to remain in the EU—everybody else, not.

The referendum campaign in the mass media was overwhelmingly-dominated by Remain—but the effects of decades of corruption and self-destruction in this class was very evident—in that the Remain campaign held all the cards, but was ineffectual to the point of counter-productive in its tactics. . . .

One scenario is that pretty soon, the fickle, mass media-addicted majority will soon forget this vote, just like they have forgotten many other (should-have-been) highly significant events over the past decades. (The mass media, after all, are overwhelmingly in favour of Remain.)

. . . What will happen now depends on whether the majority vote is evidence of a positive and strategic resolve towards a new future for England: this would have to be some kind of ‘spiritual’ movement, a new destiny for the nation; because that is the only kind of thing which motivates large populations over long periods of time. I have said, many times, that net-positive change entails some kind of religious (and specifically Christian) revival—because I believe that ‘nationalism’ is a spent-force in the history of The West.

After further exploring the alternatives ahead, Charlton closes with a pertinent Lewis reference.

Either way, things have now ‘come to a point’ as CS Lewis put it (in That Hideous Strength)—the issues are becoming very clear, the sides are very distinct. The next few days, weeks and months will be crucial.

Indeed, they shall.

_____

* You can read The Abolition of Man here.

8 responses to C.S. Lewis & Brexit

  1. 

    I just came across another excellent article on Brexit which includes a very applicable observation from the writing of C.S. Lewis. Read it here:
    https://findingtangle.wordpress.com/2016/06/28/borders-we-need-brexit-boundaries-and-love/

  2. 

    I can’t help but feel – from reading his Sci-Fi works, where Mr. Lewis weaves in some of the lore of English history, that he would be in favor of preserving England’s identity and sovereignty. Thanks for this article!

    • 

      It’s good to note, I think, that Lewis was actually Irish, having been born and raised in Northern Ireland. Yes, he certainly enjoyed ancient and medieval myth.

  3. 

    That apocryphal Chinese curse (“May you live in interesting times”) comes to mind as I flip through the news these days. I’d wager my last groat that the figurative last battle in Revelation is being waged now, if I had a groat :) Particularly as we see false prophets/”evangelical” leaders being unmasked as the church faces its greatest challenge on a universal scale.

    • 

      You can’t find your groats because they’ve been converted to euros!

      Actually, groats were British, so that didn’t happen, but they were part of the old system that has been replaced. Once worth four pennies, I believe, long before adoption of a decimal system. Forgive the ramblings of a numismatist…

      Sadly, you may be correct about the last days (we are, after all, 24 hours closer to them each new day). There are, indeed, a tragic number of frauds and abusers posing as people of God. I’m more concerned these days, though, about the hundreds of thousands of Christians being persecuted, imprisoned, beaten, raped and murdered for their faith in Jesus. May Christ put an end to it soon!

      • 

        Amen!

        As for your being a numismatist, here’s a challenge: I hope you will indulge your readers with a post wedding your bent towards all things numismatic and C.S. Lewis :)

      • 

        Thanks for the challenge… I’ve never considered that question. I’ll see what I can come up with, even if it’s only of interest to you and me :)

  4. 

    These are crucial times. As you say will there be enough paying attention long enough to show resolve for a new positive direction. Like yu, I feel it depends on people and some sort of spiritual awakening towards good.

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