How Precious You Are

March 23, 2012 — 7 Comments

God loves you.

It doesn’t matter how loveable, or unloveable you are, he loves you.

It doesn’t matter whether you praise his Name or deny his existence, he loves you.

It doesn’t matter whether or not you love him. You can even hate him . . . but he still loves you.

Doesn’t make sense to our fallen human reason, but it’s true. One of the amazing revelations of the Christian Scriptures is that God loves each and every one of the people he has created.

Every human being is unique, and each is precious to God. Whether you feel like it or not . . . whether you feel undeserving or (far more dangerously) you think you are a pretty “good” person . . . you are precious to him.

I find it intriguing how some manmade religions and philosophies consciously downplay the uniqueness of each person. What is clearly evidence of God’s infinite creativity—the glorious diversity of men and women the world over—is seen as something odd. A cosmic fluke to be remedied when all essence returns to the amorphous and undifferentiated “whole.”

The elimination of what makes you and me precisely who we are, seems to be the goal of some of these worldviews. But deep within each of our souls we know that this pursuit is wrong. It’s alien to the core of our existence. Loss of identity is, in a phrase, not that for which we were created. You and I were made for a different purpose. And our distinctive personalities (and even our quirks) in this one-time-in-all-creation combination, are no accident.

In his treatise on why suffering exists, C.S. Lewis offers a powerful glimpse into the singularity of our souls. He argues that Christ’s sacrifice was no generic or blanket wonder. Rather, it was a divinely individualized miracle. Listen to Lewis:

The signature on each soul may be a product of heredity and environment, but that only means that heredity and environment are among the instruments whereby God creates a soul. I am considering not how, but why, He makes each soul unique. If He had no use for all these differences, I do not see why He should have created more souls than one. Be sure that the ins and outs of your individuality are no mystery to Him; and one day they will no longer be a mystery to you. The mould in which a key is made would be a strange thing, if you had never seen a key: and the key itself a strange thing if you had never seen a lock. Your soul has a curious shape because it is a hollow made to fit a particular swelling in the infinite contours of the Divine substance, or a key to unlock one of the doors in the house with many mansions.

For it is not humanity in the abstract that is to be saved, but you—you, the individual reader, John Stubbs or Janet Smith. Blessed and fortunate creature, your eyes shall behold Him and not another’s. All that you are, sins apart, is destined, if you will let God have His good way, to utter satisfaction. The Brocken spectre ‘looked to every man like his first love’, because she was a cheat. But God will look to every soul like its first love because He is its first love. Your place in heaven will seem to be made for you and you alone, because you were made for it—made for it stitch by stitch as a glove is made for a hand. (C.S. Lewis, The Problem of Pain.)

I suspect that the intimately personal nature of God’s love for us is one of the things that moves some people from agnosticism to atheism. And I think I just may address that distinction in my next post.

Christians may cease reading here.

A personal and sincere note to any unbelievers reading this column. I’m not writing this to offend you, or to push any of the buttons that may be holdovers from your days in restrictive or destructive religious settings.

If you’ve never believed, I encourage you to tune out the voices (on both sides of the issue). Go directly to the primary account(s) of Jesus’ life and read them. (There are four “Gospel” accounts of his ministry, but I encourage you to first read the Gospel according to Saint John.) Any of your Christian friends would be eager to offer you a copy of the Bible for no cost, but it’s also available for free download at various sites. For example, here you can download an entire Bible in English Standard Version (ESV) for free.

If you once believed, but have laid your faith aside, I don’t want to offer guilt. Instead, listen to this promise of grace. Just as the father of the Prodigal Son was always awaiting the return of his child, the same joyous welcome home awaits you. If ever you desire to return home, know with certainty that he’ll welcome you again, not as a servant or second class citizen, but as his son or daughter. And you’ll hear the words from that parable proclaimed over you: “It is fitting to celebrate and be glad, for this your brother [or sister] was dead, and is alive; they were lost, and are found.” (Luke 15:32).

7 responses to How Precious You Are

  1. 

    This is a great post. Thank you for sharing!

  2. 

    A simple truth. A quiet one. Don’t hear it much any more. I love way Lewis compares making a glove to fit one hand to a person’s place crafted in Heaven. It’s not “collective” but a single child of God being welcomed by the Father according to plan. Well written. Thanks. You’ve made it a peaceful afternoon.

  3. 

    Any reading recommendations for the lapsed believer? I would like to provide something along those lines to someone who believes they are/has chosen to be outside of relationship with God.

    • 

      Wow, that’s a great–and challenging–question. I would really need to know just why a person has lapsed to be able to make a suggestion. People grow cold over time, by forsaking the fellowship of the saints, some doubt because of a false perception (fostered by the world) that faith and science are incompatible. Others are angry because someone they love has died. Still others are confused because they were overly “sheltered” during their youth and didn’t realize there were so many “competing” world views. Each of these individuals requires a different sort of presentation of the Gospel to reach them…

  4. 

    Great post! It brought me warmth. Thanks for stopping by my blog and liking my post ‘The silence is deafening’

  5. 

    I’m so glad to have found your blog (so thanks for “liking” my calligraphy of a C.S. Lewis quote)! My husband and I visited Oxford and had a delightful time searching for The Eagle & Child (found it and ate lunch there!). I’m looking forward to more of your posts, particularly about your suspicion “that the intimately personal nature of God’s love for us is one of the things that moves some people from agnosticism to atheism.” This is what draws me closer to Him, what I long to know more about, so I’m interested to hear your thoughts on how that could push someone away. Thanks!

    • 

      Thanks for the comment. Paradoxically, it doesn’t actually push them farther “away,” since there atheists are arguably closer to God than agnostics… I hope to get a chance to write about that soon.

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