A Font for All Seasons

December 1, 2011 — 2 Comments

There are a variety of ailments that disproportionately affect writers. Mundane disorders such as Repetitive Stress Injury, Computer Eyestrain and assorted carbuncles arise as no surprise. But there is another, psychological malady that can cripple an author’s creativity and savage his time schedule.

A fascination with fonts is a logical curiosity among people who love words. You can find stylized fonts reflecting for almost any special interest. In fact, just four months ago the total number of fonts surpassed the population of the planet. An affection for different fonts is one thing . . . but an obsession is quite another. Addicts are commonly referred to as “fontaholics.”

There truly are fonts for all seasons . . . too many versions to number. As an example of a unique font, you can check out Narnia BLL.

This lovely lettering is inspired by the recent films about the land of C.S. Lewis’ anointed Chronicles.

And It’s Not Just about Aesthetics

Recently a Dutch scholar devised a nefont specifically for people suffering from dyslexia.

Their approach, based on “weighting” the various letters and symbols, has been shown to improve readability for dyslexics. (Truth is, it would probably make reading easier for anyone.) Some see this new font as reinforcing prior studies which show serif fonts to be more legible than sans serif versions.

Whether you consider yourself immune to the lure of fonts, or are a self-confessed fontaholic, it’s a field about which every writer should understand the basics.

2 responses to A Font for All Seasons

  1. 

    Hey, really interesting post! I love fonts and letters. (I took a whole semester in “Lettering” in as part of marketing/art degree) Such fun – I love serifs. When reading, my letters don’t tumble like the ones in the video – they actually jump and leap frog over each other to switch positions (only other dyslexics laugh and can identify with that – everyone else thinks you’re making it up). I also read “ll” as a letter unit – like with Spanish language. Anyway, enjoyed this post. Always something good to read here. thanks

Trackbacks and Pingbacks:

  1. Choosing Trustworthy Fonts « Mere Inkling - July 28, 2015

    […] A Font for Dyslexics […]

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